Absolutely not; anyone got any better ideas?

Warning : Cursed :warning:

2 Likes

I think you can get them down to 24 or 22awg. There are also crimping tools around.

Also called Dupont cables

2 Likes

Hi Pix
One better idea for what its worth.
Learn to solder.
Cheers Bob

3 Likes

Haha! :rofl:
Not impressed?
I was stoked that I managed to get this to work at all.

Or are you saying i should stop using breadboards and use a pcb?

2 Likes

Hi Pix

Just don’t present it for any sort of QA inspection

Certainly not. But I am not a fan of using those header pins in a breadboard. They are on the large side and the cheaper bread boards get a bit unreliable sometimes. And believe me, when you are trying to develop something reliability is an absolute must. It is hard enough without building in intermittent faults.
My preferred method for this sort of thing is a small piece of about 22AWG tinned copper wire attached to the jumper lead with sometimes a piece of thin heatshrink for a bit of support and stability.
Cheers Bob

2 Likes

Any tips on how I could improve my soldering?
Do you think I just need to be rocking a hotter iron?
Am I using too much solder?

I found this challenging because I struggled to get the wiring to stay in contact with the header pin using my third arm. So I’d have to push the tinned wire into the header pin to maintain contact and punch enough metal into it that it wouldn’t just peel off when the heat was removed.

1 Like

Hi Pix
Can you stand a bit of constructive criticism. Not trying to be funny or smart but if I can go down the second pic pin for pin with what is wrong I think you are quite capable of learning something. Will do something tomorrow when I get a bit of time (there is a bit of drama going on here at the moment) as long as you are not going to be upset at anything I am going to say.

That is what I am going to try to do. but if you are going to be upset at all I will say nothing.
Cheers Bob

1 Like

Sure can! :smiley:
Historically I’ve thrived on some honest criticism.
Really good of you to ask first. :+1:

I definitely found this a challenging solder compared to through-hole soldering.
I had a tough time keeping purchase between wire and the header pin.
I’m hoping there are some simple tricks I can learn to make these jobs a little easier going forward.
I agree that this could be better and im stoked if you would comb through it, point out where I went wrong, and what I should have done.

So lovely of you to offer your experience Bob.
If things are hectic for you at the moment, take your time.

Pix :heavy_heart_exclamation:

1 Like

Hey Pix,

Another rec, if you grab the jumpers Charlie recommend (or any similar Dupont style). You can open the clasp and swap the shroud out for a different pin count or size.

Ex a 3x1:

2 Likes

Male header soldered with breadboard jumper wires? For what purpose actually?

1 Like

@lia262073 I have used a similar construction, ribbon cable wire soldered to right angle male header with heat shrink over cable and pin to stop it shorting out. Pugged into a Raspberry Pi Zero hat, crimped male pins would have been too tall to fit in the case I used.

3 Likes

I bought one of these some time ago, very useful to hold things to solder together.

Also one of these tools and have gone through a number of crimp packets and plastic sockets.
Expensive but well worth it and has been well used over a number of years.

2 Likes

Maybe crimping is the answer.
I do have a good third arm, I think it’s just a little fiddly to get them to stay pressed together.
Practice I suppose.

I think this is the better way of achieving my goal.
I’m often having to patch together 2 bytes.
e.g. maybe I have two shift registers running to some LEDs so I can visualise my data.
Patching 16 jumpers together every time is painful and messy.
You’re header pin solution might be my best bet.


DIP ribbon cable plug

Ah! This is what I’ve accidentally re-invented!

@Aaron Found me this, which would work for protoboard but not a breadboard.

Lot’s of great ideas on this thread.
Thanks everyone who jumped in to offer thoughts :slight_smile:
Pix :heavy_heart_exclamation:

3 Likes

Unsure of what you are connecting between but have you considered using Ethernet cable and connectors? It has the 8 strands you need, connectors are cheap and reliable and the crimping tool is not expensive. I think you can get the female connectors in a solder version or the more common “blade” type connection where you just slide the cable strand in and it slices through the outer insulation. A lot would depend on how you could mount the female sockets to you equipment.

2 Likes

@Greg175980 that’s brilliant. :+1:

2 Likes

Hi Pix

Called insulation displacement connector.
If you use this be careful to get the connector as close to 90º with the cable as possible. They can be assembled with enough of a slant to have some pins short to the adjacent wire.
This “IDC” type of connector comes in lots of flavours. Even “D” types.
Cheers Bob

4 Likes

Far less cursed than your original image. @Greg175980 I would have never thought to use an ethernet cable here, well done.

1 Like

There can be only one

Also, far easier to splooge hot glue over it than faff around with heatshrink.

1 Like