Core Electronics Forum

Looking for a speaker that can make dog whistle sounds

Hi,

I’m looking for a speaker that could be used to make dog whistle sounds. I’ve been told I should be “aiming for 23kHz/23000 Hz if we want dog whistle frequency”
Dose know which speakers can do that? And do those speakers require a beefy board and power supply? If so could I get some recommendations for that as well?

Thank you,
Alex

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Hi Alex
I have a feeling that most (including high end ones) speakers cut of at about 20kHz.

I think you will have to research some specialist suppliers to find a tweeter that will go that high. Prepare to pay some $$$$ though. I think that what you are after will not come cheap.

WES Components would be worth a look. They have a pretty good range and are trade suppliers so might be a few $$ cheaper than retail. Up market Hi Fi suppliers or Element 14, RS components worth a try although I don’t know what the latter 2 have in this line of products.

An amplifier is the next consideration although I think most reasonable amps can get up into that range, usually the speakers are the weak link.
Cheers Bob

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Hi Robert and Alex,

Generally you don’t need to go too far to find a datasheet that goes up to 40k on the frequency response graph, as some audiophiles believe they have super-human hearing, and care about the stuff above 20k.

Wagner are a little more open to the public than WES, and I did find a tweeter that had OK response above 20, but like Robert says, response above 20 is not required in 99% of cases, and such is a bit hard to find.

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Hi James
Wagner Electronic Services, WES, Same company, same address. 84-89 Parramatta Rd, Summer Hill.
But the do seem to have a different phone number and as you say may be a bit more accessible than WES. I remember Wagner being around some 50 odd years ago and I think from memory they used to be on Hume Hwy, Ashfield but I may be wrong there.
Cheers Bob

Hi Rob,

I went looking for the expansion of the acronym WES to confirm my suspicion of that exact link, but didn’t find it on their site. I’ve seen a few companies do the same thing by acting as a distributor but also “distributing” to their own consumer-friendly alias.

You could probably get better prices out of WES, but I figured online info accessibility was more important for a one-off like this

Anyway, back to the project at hand!
-James

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Hi James
One last thing on that subject.

I could be wrong but I think WES may be the alias. I think Wagner was the original and WES came along much later. I haven’t gone into the history of either company so can’t be absolutely sure.
Cheers Bob

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Hi Alex
Just had another look at your post

A speaker won’t make any sounds unless you drive it with something.

I assume you are referring to the amplifier to drive the speaker. This also requires you to input the sound you eventually want to come from the speaker. In your case an oscillator operating at your required frequency.

In a nutshell no speaker and amplifier will just emit dog whistle sounds. You will have to generate the sounds you want.

As a matter of interest what are you intending to do with this set up. You can get dog training whistles you blow with your mouth and also low power electronic ones for just a few dollars. If you intend to run a bit of serious power around the district your neighbours may have something to say about this. At the extreme end if you intend to harm (I hope this is not the case) a dog’s hearing for any reason I don’t think you will get much response here.
Cheers Bob

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Hey

It’s not for anything like that - I’m trying to make a homemade one of these - https://catdeterrent.com.au/
Basically I want one I can activate with a sensor and control more easily, ergo homemade
The aim is to keep it all as low as possible so it simply annoys the cats and dosen’t hurt them

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Hi Alex
I know these whistles can be used to train dogs. You want to watch that all the cats in the area don’t come running to your place.
Cheers Bob